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Microchipping

dreamstime 2217564The importance of microchipping can never be stressed enough.

A cat can stray just a little too far; an eager puppy can slip its lead or a dog can take advantage of an open gate.  Losing a pet is very distressing and reuniting lost pets with their owners can prove very difficult if the pets cannot be reliably identified. Microchipping is a very inexpensive and simple way of permanent identification for any pet.

Your vet will inject a tiny microchip (about the size of a grain of rice) under the loose skin of your pet’s neck, which will give your pet his own personal identification number. It’s quick, painless and very safe.

Should your pet stray and get handed in to a veterinary surgery, animal welfare group, the police or local authority, they have special hand held scanners that can detect and “read” the information on the microchips.

After checking your pet’s unique number against the national database and identifying him as yours, you will be reunited without further delay.

These days, it is not just dogs and cats that can be microchipped - rabbits and even exotic pets can also be chipped.

However, it is important to note that legally, all dogs should also wear a collar and tag in public areas. The tag should have the owner's address and surname on it.   Any additional information is up to you. If a stray dog is found not wearing a tag with this information, owners can be fined up to £5,000!

300 227 bruce-and-his-ownerA Story with a Happy Ending - A Search for Bruce Around the World!

An old, very wet and disorientated Border Collie, found wandering on the A281 in Bramley was handed in to Pet Doctors Veterinary Clinics at Shalford by a kind member of the public.

The Pet Doctors team dried him off, checked him over and gave him some food and then set about tracing his owners.  In the meantime Peter Burnage, the Guildford Borough Council dog warden, took Bruce to the local rescue centre.“He had a collar but no tag, so we scanned him for a microchip and to our delight, he had one,” explained Leanne Millard, veterinary nurse at Shalford. “I called the national database, Pet Log, to get his owners details but was dismayed to be told that the microchip was such an old one that it was no longer on their database!”

Leanne then embarked on a lengthy investigation to trace the dog’s owners. The only information she had was that the microchip was a Trovan chip. Having looked this up on the internet, Leanne found a contact telephone number for the UK office of Trovan. They informed her that the dog’s microchip number was an American chip and subsequently emailed the American branch for details of the owner. The Americans found out that the chip was registered in Australia but the contact details for the owner were no longer current!  Luckily, however, the owners had provided alternative contact details.

“The owners’ parents, who also lived in Australia, were contacted and they gave me their daughter’s telephone number who had since moved to Guildford!” continued Leanne. “The UK office eventually called us back after 24hrs and gave us the dog’s current owners’ details. At long last I was able to call the owner and Bruce, who is 17years old, was safely re-united with his owner.”

“We were delighted to see Bruce again,” said Anita Kim, Bruce’s owner.  We had Bruce microchipped a long time ago, in case something like this happened but, when we moved, we never thought to inform Pet Log of our change of address. The 4.00am call from our parents in Australia was music to our ears!

We know that microchipping is highly recommended but who would have thought that we would locate Bruce from the other side of the world? Hopefully Bruce’s story will endorse the need to ensure you register your change of address for your microchipped pets as well,” concluded Anita.

Microchipping is a very inexpensive and simple way of permanent identification for any pet. Your vet will inject a tiny microchip (about the size of a grain of rice) under the loose skin of your pet’s neck, which will give your pet his own personal identification number. It’s quick, painless and very safe and helps to safeguard your pet’s future.

 

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